Sunday, March 15, 2009

Corn Chowder

(allrecipes.com)
Ingredients:
  • 2 (14.5 ounce) cans chicken broth
  • 2 (15 ounce) cans whole kernel corn
  • 1 large white onion, diced
  • 3 cups diced potatoes
  • 2 (12 fluid ounce) cans evaporated milk
  • 1/3 cup butter
  • salt and pepper to taste

DIRECTIONS

  1. In a large pot over medium heat, combine broth, corn, onion and potatoes. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat, cover and simmer 15 to 20 minutes, until potatoes are just tender.
  2. Stir in evaporated milk and butter until butter is just melted. Season with salt and pepper and serve at once.
History: Meat was often a luxury for many people during the Great Depression. If they didn't live on a farm and raised their own lifestock or couldn't hunt or fish for their meat, they cooked meatless meals that were starchy and filling. Corn chowder certainly fills the bill, and it's made with chicken stock, so it has a hint of a chicken taste.

3 comments:

  1. I've made a whole lot of corn chowder! Substitutions to make this even more economical:
    instead of 24 ounces evaporated milk, use 2 cups of powdered milk mixed with 3 cups of water (buy the powdered milk in the largest 40-quart box). Instead of 28 ounces of chicken broth, use 3 teaspoons of chicken "base" in a jar, along with 3 cups of water, or just use three chicken bouillon cubes with the water. This will also taste better if you saute the onions to golden, which sweetens them, then add the other ingredients. If you happen to have any bacon grease, that would be great to saute the onions in, or just use margarine or cooking oil. Cooking cheap involves a whole new way of looking at food.

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  2. I would also substitute any other kind of onion, yellow or sweet or red, for white onion. Just my preference, but white onions are more expensive generally than yellow, as well as stronger flavored.

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  3. Good ideas, Anne! Thanks for the feedback!

    To me, making substitutions or additions to a recipe is a way of taking something and making it your own. Sometimes, you just have to "make do", which is exactly what people did during the Great Depression!

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